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Explore the FUNdamentals of architecture as you stick close to home through quick and easy neighborhood walks (Ages 3-6).

For our Neighborhood Strollers series, CAC education staff (and their kiddos) practiced safe social distancing measures, keeping within a few blocks of their homes and allowing neighbors personal space. As you explore your own neighborhoods, please exercise good judgement and social protocols.

The Victorian Part 1

Knowing which clues to look for helps us take educated guesses about the ages and styles of all types of buildings. Check out these next-door neighbors in CAC Manager of School and Family Programs Rebecca Boland’s neighborhood and let us know what Victorian houses you find in yours!

 

The Victorian Part 2

Knowing which clues to look for helps us take educated guesses about the ages and styles of all types of buildings. Using the clues we shared in Neighborhood Strollers: The Victorian Part 1, take a close look at this house in CAC Manager of School and Family Programs Rebecca Boland’s neighborhood and let us know whether or not you think it’s a Victorian home!

 

Adaptive Use

“Adaptive use” is what we call a structure originally built for one purpose that plays a different role today. Check out this example from CAC Director of Interpretation Adam Rubin’s neighborhood and let us know what adaptive use buildings are in yours!

 

Housing Types: The Two-Flat

Understanding people’s needs at various points in history often helps you understand why buildings of the same age often look so much alike. CAC Director of Interpretation Adam Rubin gives a quick summary of the classic Chicago “two-flat” and why they were so popular among families new to the city in the early 20th century. Are there any two-flats in your neighborhood? How many do you see?

 

Bricks

Have you ever wondered what buildings are made of? Join CAC Manager of School and Family Programs Rebecca Boland as she takes a closer look at a commonly overlooked material, brick.

 

Shapes in Architecture

Just about any shape you’ve ever learned or could possibly imagine has been used by an architect on the outside or inside of a building. Looking closely at the structures in your neighborhood, what shapes do you see? Let’s take a stroll with CAC Senior Manager of Education and Experience Angela Esposito

 

Georgian Revival

Knowing which clues to look for helps us take educated guesses about the ages and styles of all types of buildings. Check out this Georgian Revival home in CAC Manager of School and Family Programs Rebecca Boland’s neighborhood and let us know what Georgian Revival houses you find in yours!

Fun fact: Georgian Revival is named not for the U.S. state of Georgia, but for four kings of England who all had the same name: George! The first Georgian period in architecture spans the years those Georges reigned: 1714 to 1830. When this architectural style came back into vogue in the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was called the “Georgian Revival.”

 

Murals

Join CAC Interim Education Coordinator Mizael Robledo as he takes a moment to appreciate a book-themed mural in Chicago’s Pilsen neighborhood. What murals do you see in your own neighborhood? What are the ideas, themes and styles of those murals? Let us know in the comments below!