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DIVISION 10

DIVISION 10
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY



Produce a set of photographs of one of the locations listed below.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO ENTER THIS DIVISION?

  • Open to all Chicago public high school students.
  • Architecture students must submit photos as a second project and must complete and submit an additional project to enter in this division.
  • Non-Architecture students may enter in this division as their only project.
DESIGN PROCESS FOR DIVISION 10: ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY

1)       DEFINING THE PROBLEM  
The challenge with this division is to present a photo study of a building, using four (4) images that you have captured with a digital camera.

Select from the following buildings/sites:

  • Marina City
  • Trump International Hotel and Tower
  • The Jay Pritzker Pavilion
  • Mary Bartelme Park
  • The Park at Lakeshore East
  • Lincoln Park Zoo South Pond Redevelopment


2)       COLLECTING INFORMATION  
At this stage you will want to consider all the locations before deciding which one interests you most. Also consider time of day and sun location that best shows your subject.

  • What location appeals to you, and why?
  • What images could you potentially find for this location? Which ones appeal to you, and why?
  • There are four required types of images (listed below). Consider what each term means before shooting with your camera.
  • Can you find examples of these approaches online? Use Flickr and Google images to search for inspiration.
  • Visit the site. Where is the best location to capture the building or site from?

3)       BRAINSTORM & ANALYZE                  
Now that you have identified your location, it is time to plan for the images that you will shoot. When planning to take pictures consider these compositional elements:

  • PATTERNS: Emphasizing and highlighting patterns can lead to striking shots.
  • LINES: Can draw the eye to key focal points in a shot and to impact the ‘feel’ of an image greatly.
  • SYMMETRY/BALANCE: A symmetrical shot with strong composition and a good point of interest can lead to a striking image.
  • TEXTURE: With the clever use of ‘texture’ images can come alive and become almost three dimensional.
  • DEPTH OF FIELD: Recognizing the difference between foreground and background can be a valuable skill when you want to lead your audience to a particular area of focus.


Chicago-Based Architectural Photographers: Look for the above concepts and elements in their work.

Wayne Cable - http://www.selfmadephoto.com
David Bader - http://www.davidbader.com
Scott Weidemann - http://www.weidemannphoto.com
Philip Castleton - http://www.philipcastleton.com
Marian Kraus - http://www.mariankrausphotography.com
David Schalliol - http://www.davidschalliol.com/photography_galleries/isolated/index.html

4)       DEVELOP SOLUTIONS
Once you have narrowed your focus and planned ahead, you are ready to take pictures. Each project for this division must include the following four (4) types of images.

Four Required Images

  • 1.Surroundings: What is the context around the subject? For example, a surroundings shot of Pritzker Pavilion would include the pavillion and surrounding buildings.
  • 2.Portrait of the Building: Taken from the exterior, this photo should capture the building itself (most or all of the building), but does not have to include surroundings. For example a portrait shot of Pritzker Pavilion should focus on the pavilion but does not have to show any surrounding buildings.
  • 3.Detail Shot: What close-up features of the building or site are particularly interesting?
  • 4.Interior: What are some interior images that help to further define the building? For example, an Interior shot of Pritzker Pavillion should be taken from inside the structure (as opposed to surroundings and portrait shots, which need to be taken from outside of the building or site).


5)       GATHER FEEDBACK
Show your teachers and fellow classmates your images to get suggestions for improvement.
Notice any patterns inside what people say? Maybe this can help refine your final project.

6)       IMPROVE AND FINISH YOUR DESIGN
Combine feedback with your final thoughts. Now that you have created a set of images, perhaps you need to return to the location to gather some more images? It will be easier the second time.
Refine your project until you feel comfortable submitting it to the Chicago Architecture Foundation for the Newhouse judges to evaluate.

PRESENTATION REQUIREMENTS

Your final project must include the following components:

Each project must feature a total of four images. (1) surroundings shot, (2) portrait, (3) detail, and (4) interior image.
Print size should be 8”x10” or 8.5” x 11”.
Photographs should be mounted on poster board provided by CAF, which must be aligned for horizontal hanging.

RULES

Please follow these rules when working on this Newhouse division:

Photographs must be your own work plagiarized work will be disqualified.
You may produce any kind of print; black and white, color, digital, re-mastered, etc. There are no restrictions on how you produce the print as long as the images are your own work.
Photographs may not be submitted in teams. One student per project.
If the photograph includes an individual who is clearly recognizable, the person must sign a photography release form. Submit completed release forms with your project. Ask you teacher for a copy of the form, or If needed you may email newhouse(at)architecture.org to have this emailed to you.

JUDGING CRITERIA

The judges will be evaluating your design project on:

Quality of the four required images, based on strength of compositions and overall presentation technique.
Stong use of the above-mentioned compositional elements inside of your images (patterns, lines, symmetry, balance, depth of field).
Technically sound. Are your images in focus? Is there enough light?
Attention to detail: is your project well-presented? How clean is the work and format?
Ability of the four photographs to tell a story about a building or site.







 

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